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Review: The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver

Nate Silver has become a popular figure in the last 5 years due majorly in part to his successful prediction of almost every part of the 2012 election cycle.  His website (fivethirtyeight.com, named after the electoral college) is one of… Continue Reading →

Audio Book Review: The Big Bad Book of Bill Murray by Robert Schnakenberg

Robert Schnakenberg’s The Big Bad Book of Bill Murray: A Critical Appreciation of the World’s Finest Actor is an irreverent, encyclopedic collection of anecdotes, film reviews, retrospectives, and tidbits. The collection et al is as quirky and idiosyncratic as the… Continue Reading →

Review: The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable by Nassim Taleb

This is a hard book for me to review because it is in the rare section of my library that I don’t often suggest for others.  It is simply too difficult and wordy of a read to be picked up… Continue Reading →

Review: Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely

Dan Ariely offers a poignant and concise view into the “hidden forces that shape our decisions”.  In the same vein as Daniel Kahneman and Richard Thaler, Ariely explores why people do the things they do and why so often they… Continue Reading →

Review: Nudge by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein

Sometimes all we need in life is a nudge in the right direction.  The field of Behavioral Economics (of which Thaler is considered the “Godfather” of) has some interesting applications to this concept. Nudge explores how influential the small things… Continue Reading →

Review: Influence by Robert Cialdini

Influence has been a bestseller since its release in 1984, and for very good reason.  It is the quintessential must read for any person in the business of persuasion (or anyone that wants to combat those trying to persuade them)…. Continue Reading →

Review: How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

How to Win Friends has been in print for 75 years, and probably will be for another century.  Dale Carnegie condensed years of experience influencing people and making friends into a very readable 250 pages, and the world is thankful… Continue Reading →

Review: Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner

Freakonomics is possibly the most digestible Economics book ever created.  It is the exploration of outlandish questions from the viewpoint of an economics professor (Levitt) and an acclaimed writer for the New York Times (Dubner).   If you slept through… Continue Reading →

Review: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell

I had a hard time deciding which Gladwell book to review first; they are all truly great pieces that help make sense of the world around us.   Gladwell hit it out of the park with Blink.  He looks at… Continue Reading →

Guest Post: Cookbook Review – The Fearless Gourmet: Decoding Menus From Around the World

The Single Gourmand, Colin King. He runs a great foodie site, jammed pack with recipes that are geared toward helping singles and couples enjoy the art of cooking. Be sure to check out The Single Gourmand blog and site. The… Continue Reading →

REVIEW: More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

More Happy Than Not is a rare book for a number of reasons.  First, the novel deals with numerous difficult and complicated issues including friendship, morality, sexuality and the human spirit in a very powerful way, but avoids being heavy… Continue Reading →

REVIEW: Pinball, 1973 by Haruki Murakami (Wind/Pinball)

Wind/Pinball contains Murakami’s first attempts at writing, in the form of two novellas.  Because these books were released separately and intended to be looked at as individual entries to a connected series, I have chosen to review each separately.   Pinball,… Continue Reading →

REVIEW: Hear The Wind Sing by Haruki Murakami (Wind/Pinball)

Wind/Pinball contains Murakami’s first attempts at writing, in the form of two novellas.  Because these books were released separately and intended to be looked at as individual entries to a connected series, I have chosen to review each separately.   According… Continue Reading →

REVIEW: Return Once More by Trisha Leigh (The Historians #1)

Return Once More offers readers a lot to grab their attention and imagination, including an advanced science fiction society, time travel, a subtle post apocalyptic environment and a romance spanning across time.  My biggest concern after reading the book’s summary and… Continue Reading →

REVIEW: Not Quite Gone by Lyla Payne

Not Quite Gone has a different feel from the previous entries in the series.  Part of this can be attributed to a new setting and more than a few additional characters, however, Lyla Payne’s novel’s new feel is largely due… Continue Reading →

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